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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
told us look like pipe bombs. so police are still in there searching, trying to learn if those packs and canisters are, indeed, explosive before they can sound the all-clear. harry. >> smith: wyatt andrews outside discovery headquarters tonight. thanks. our other big story is hurrican earl. the governors of north carolina, virginia, and maryland have declared states of emergency as the storm moves closer and grows stronger. it is a category four again with 135 mile an hour winds and it cuts an imposing image in the latest photo from space. at last report, earl was about 600 miles south-southeast of cape hatteras, north carolina. it could reach there late tomorrow or early friday, then roll up the east coast. hurricane watches and warnings are up as far north as cape cod. kelly cobiella is in kill devil hills, north carolina, tonight and has the latest. kelly, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, harry despite a picture-perfect beach day here, some tourists and locals alike on the most remote of the islands spent it packing up because hurrican earl's winds and rain could be close
u.s. forces in afghanistan, told the "wall street journal" burning the koran could endanger troops and the overall effort. kelly cobiella is in gainesville tonight. kelly, so far the pastor is refusing to change his plans. >> reporter: he's absolutely sticking with this right now, katie. kerry jones says he's not doing this as a publicity stunt. he says he feels a real religious calling and he refuses to back down. >> sooner or later we're going to have to say no to radical islam. >> reporter: terry jones believes radical islam could take over america and the best way to fight back is by sending a radical message: burning a stack of korans on the anniversary of 9/11. >> we see an element of islam that is very radical and we could not get their attention by just sending some type of message. we thought this was a radical message that will get their attention. >> reporter: jones know it is actions of his small church are being felt around the world and he's heard the warnings from general petraeus that his actions could put american soldiers' lives at risk. >> we understand what the
afford it. get california working again-for all of us. >> couric: tonight, losing ground. the dramatic impact of the recession, americans making less than a decade ago, living in homes that have fallen in value. i'm katie couric. also tonight, can president obama recapture the magic? in 2008 he inspired the young to vote in droves. can he get them back to the polls in november? and faith and knowledge in this one nation under god, many americans know surprisingly little about religion. >> we're a nation of religious illiterates. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the recession may be officially over, but it has left the confidence of americans badly shaken. and numbers just out from the government today show why. since the recession began, household incomes have fallen nearly 3% to just over $50,000. adjusting for inflation, americans are making $4,000 less than they were a decade ago. and their biggest investment, their home, has lost nearly 6% of i
. >> reporter: the top 20% of earners in the country now make more than half of the income generated in the u.s. that's up from 49.7% in 2007. and the poorest 20% earn only 3% of the country's income. the great divide is a college degree. the unemployment rate for college graduates is less than 5%. for those with just a high school diploma, it's more than 10%. and according to another study, the median income for a college grad-- nearly $56,000-- is more than double that of workers who finished only high school. >> low-skill labor is really in trouble in this economy. the demand for their services is shrinking like crazy. the traditional ways that they moved into the middle-class-- manufacturing, construction-- are dead in the water. >> reporter: and that income gap may only grow wider even as the economy recovers because the top end usually recovers faster than the bottom. katie? >> couric: anthony mason, thank you, anthony. and jobs are the big issue in the midterm elections. election day, by the way, is five weeks away, but early voting is already under way in seven states. with control of c
to him." katie? >> katie: nancy cordes on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy, thank you. turning overseas now, two months after monsoon floods inundated pakistan, the situation there is only getting worse. nearly two million homes were damaged or destroyed and today unicef said 105,000 children under five years old could die from malnutrition. earlier today i spoke with pakistan's foreign minister shah mahmood qureshi about a number of things, including the crisis in his country. your country is still reeling from devastating floods. the acumen fund, which is a nonprofit organization here in the u.s., recently visited is the area and came back with some very moving, tragic images. can you describe the level of human suffering there. >> it's huge. you've never had a natural disaster of this nag any tuesday before. the area the size of the united kingdom is underwater. 20 million people in pakistan have been affected by these floods. shelterless. billions of dollars worth of standing crops have been lost. livestock. so it's a very serious situation we're dealing with. >> couric: the united
by this latest news, anthony mason tells us there are at least some signs of a turnaround, at least on the home front. >> reporter: in los angeles, so many of the 27,000 foreclosed houses have fallen into disrepair. >> we felt we needed to do something about it. >> reporter: today the city raised fines on banks that don't keep up their properties. >> it's $1,000 per day, per violation. and they can take up to $100,000 per property. >> reporter: with more than five million people behind on their mortgage payments, bank repossessions have hit record levels. >> we're on a pace right now to see about 1.2 million homes repossessed by the end of the year. that is simply unprecedented in the history of the housing market. >> reporter: the banks have taken possession of about 900,000 homes, only about a third of which are actually on the market. >> the banks could be flooding the market with a lot more distressed properties, and i think the fact that they're not is showing some restraint in trying to keep the housing market stable. >> reporter: americans are growing more optimistic about the housing ma
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)